The Power of Your Nose . . . and Ears . . .

springsteen and clemons

As most of you know, I make wine for a living – and dig it every day. One of my favorite aspects of what I do is how others get enjoyment out of what I do. To me, that makes it all worth it.

One of the other aspects of why I dig wine is how it can affect people – most of the time good, but sometimes not so. And what I’m talking about here is specifically aromas. Our sense of smell is so strong and so personal that no two people smell and react to the same thing in the same way.

I’ve had customers smell specific wines and I can see a glaze come over them – they’ve been ‘transported’ somewhere else. Perhaps it was when they were a kid walking on the beach or in a forest; perhaps it was during a special meal that they had a food that somehow my wine reminded them of. Or perhaps there’s a specific aroma that brings back a ‘negative’ event in their lives – they won’t like the wine no matter how much they may want to . . .

Why am I talking about this? Well, driving back from Santa Barbara this morning, I put in an old Bruce Springsteen CD and a flood of memories came back while listening to Born to Run. I clearly remembered my good buddy John DiGiovani and I listening to this and many other songs in High School – and him explaining what ‘the girls tried to look so hard’ meant. I remember my oldest brother Ira going to see Bruce at the ‘Fabulous Forum’ back in the day, and me staying awake the next night taping Bruce’s Roxy Theater concert on the radio on my dad’s reel-to-reel recorder. And I remember how ‘spiritual’ Clarence Clemons’ saxaphone playing was – and how sad I was when he passed away a few years back . . .

I also clearly remember the 16 mile mark of the New York Marathon that I ran a number of years back. As you crossed a bridge and entered Manhattan, you ran into a tunnel – and blasting over loud speakers was Born to Run.

I love that I can be transported so easily by music, or aromas, or a movie. It’s ‘time travel’ in the most fun of ways . . .

Just thought I’d share.

Cheers!

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Does it Matter . . . Closures . . .

cork oxidation

As many of you know, I am a huge fan of the screw cap. Let me say at the beginning here that I do NOT believe it is the ‘perfect’ closure as I do NOT believe that there is such a thing.

But let me explain why I use screw caps for all of my tercero wines. Again, this is not to say that it is ‘better’, but there is a reasoning that I think is important to understand:

I do not like TCA whatsoever. For those who do not know what this is, during the aging process of corks, mold grows on the air drying cork. Sometimes, but not all of the time, a chemical compound is created that eventually becomes TCA, or tri-choloranisole for those who dig scientific names J

What’s the big deal with TCA? Well, at low levels, it simply steals the aromas from a wine, making it appear that it has none. At higher levels, it makes the wine smell of wet cardboard or of a damp basement.. That said, if you are not familiar with this smell, you probably would not pick it out as a ‘fault’ but instead might find the wine ‘earthy’ instead.  And guess what – this happens as soon as the wine comes in contact with the cork at bottling. No, you can’t tell in advance if a cork is infected unless you run costly tests on EACH cork and no, the problem does not ‘appear’ later on years after bottling.

The other thing about natural corks – one of it’s most endearing traits, the fact that it is ‘all natural’, is also one of its most challenging.. How can that be? Well, since it’s all natural, no two corks are identical. The individual cells that make up the cork itself are different shapes and sizes, and this allows for slightly different amounts of oxygen to be trapped within the cork prior to bottling and for different amounts to get through the cork during aging. This ultimately leads to ‘bottle variation’ and can, in worst case scenarios, lead to too much oxygen getting in and the wine becoming clearly oxidized. (See the picture above for an example of the same wine bottled under cork and the ‘variability’ that has led to wines of varying color and oxidation levels).

Therefore, one of the main reasons I use screwcaps is to ‘eliminate’ these variables. As a ‘manufactured’ product, there is much greater consistency with screw caps, and thus the ‘variability’ that exists with different size  cells does not exist here. There also is no chance of TCA being introduced to the wine from the closure itself. (And for those of you who will ‘argue’ that TCA does make it into wines in other ways, you are correct . . . but the VAST majority of TCA issues are cork-related).

I have no desire to make ‘sterile’ wines at all. Wines are ‘living creatures’ that will continue to evolve as long as they stay in bottle, and truly ‘blossom’ hours or even days after the bottle is open. But I take offense to the fact that a lot of ‘bottle variation’ that seems to be accepted by consumers is preventable, and as a consumer first and foremost and a winemaker second, I want to be able to stand behind my product and know with a greater degree of certainty that what my customers are consuming is what I desired them to be.

I am certainly open to your thoughts on this issue and welcome them.

Does It Matter . . . Ownership

questioning

This is the first in a series of blog posts where I’m asking pretty simple questions about aspects of our wine industry that may or may not be known to the general public – and if it helps determine whether or not you will purchase specific wines.

Kosta Browne is a winery that was started by a couple of servers at a restaurant who combined their tips to purchase grapes for their first wine.  Their brand garnered early critical acclaim and the original shareholders ‘cashed out’ a part of their equity by selling off to a smallish investment company a few years back. The cash infusion allowed them to build their own winemaking facility, among other things. Now, this investment company has ‘cashed out’ and sold its share to another investment company.

Why am I telling you this story? Well – there are many that feel that since the original owners have received all of this money and they have new investors aboard, the natural direction will be to grow bigger and probably charge more for their wines. And the feeling is that as you grow bigger, you cannot hold onto the quality you are able to achieve when you are smaller.

This really got me thinking about winery ownership and whether or not that does or should impact your support of a winery or willingness to purchase those wines.  I think most would agree that you would not support a winery owner that was, say, a murderer or something similar.

Would you support a winery owned by Billionaires? Or one that has an association with a large pharmaceutical or agricultural conglomerate? Or does if just not matter?

And what about if you didn’t know but found out later – would that change your opinion about the wine and purchasing again?

The reality is that many wineries in the US are owned by larger corporations or investment companies, some of which are ‘wine oriented’ and some of which are not. Others were started an are owned by multi-millionaires that made their money elsewhere and decided to get into the wine biz.

Does this or should this affect your support of such a winery?

I’m listening . . .

Cheers!

The Good, the Bad, and the . . .

goodbadugly

As many of you know, I like to talk a little 🙂  I also like to write a little 🙂 AND I like to take part in discussions about many things, including wine every now and then. I am active on wine bulletin boards and love the interactions that take place, and it gives me plenty of ‘food for fodder’ for blog posts, etc.

There is currently a somewhat heated discussion occurring involving a rather pricey Napa Cab that has been fun to watch – and take part in. This particular cab is produced by a well-established Napa winery that has a reputation for well-made wines, and has had that reputation for quite some time.

In fact, this particular cab was made in honor of their 40th Anniversary as a winery. That’s a long time to be making wines – and keeping the doors open for ANY business. So what’s the ‘issue’ here? Well . . . .

This cab happens to be made in a very ‘new world’ style. It’s rich, unctuous, and speaks little of ‘old world  cabs’ that the winery was known for in the past. Some might find it difficult to even determine what variety the wine is – something I personally have a problem with but others apparently do not. I don’t hold it against the wine or the winery – it’s the way they wanted to make this particular wine. And even though it’s ‘sweet’ to me, others have found it unbelievably drinkable – even at the retail price of nearly $60.

Side story – a very well-known winemaker once poured me a glass of wine and asked what I thought. I told him that it was an interesting wine but couldn’t tell what variety it was. ( It turned out to be a Grenache, my favorite variety, from a very sought after new world trophy winery.). His comment to me, which still rings in my ears years later – ‘when a wine is perfect, it transcends the variety.’ Yeah, right – BS!!!

So who has the ‘right’ to say whether this is a ‘good’ or ‘bad’ wine? Who has the right to tell you, me, or anyone else that they are ‘crazy’ or ‘wrong’ for enjoying a wine such as this one?

I’m curious to hear your thoughts on this . . .